Back Pain Chair

Back Pain Chair

Back pain—especially lower back pain—is no joke. According to the 2010 Global Burden of Disease Study, lower back pain is the single leading cause of disability worldwide. Costs associated with lower back pain in the United States exceed $100 billion. “People can develop lower back pain for a variety of reasons,” says Jay Greenstein, DC, of Sport & Spine Rehab. “It could be chronic, repetitive stress or postural issues. It could be an acute trauma like a sports injury or a car accident or a slip or a fall. There are many different causes of lower back pain.” When it comes to back pain and posture, says Greenstein, we should be thinking of our spines as layers of “bricks and jelly donuts”: The vertebral bodies are the bricks, and the discs are the jelly donuts. When those bricks and donuts curve in an unusual way—say, slumped in front of a desk—it leads to pain and inflammation over time. With so much compression over time, you might end up even slipping a disc, which is when the jelly in the donut bursts. Kneeling chairs are designed to create a pelvic shift that forces the lower back to arch. “You can decrease pressure on what’s called the facet joint,” the joints in your spine that make your back flexible, says Greenstein. Decreasing pressure on that joint relieves it of pain. “A kneeling chair to maintain the the natural curve in the lower back, which can potentially help patients who have lower back pain.” Indeed, a 2015 study showed that a kneeling chair can help people with back pain reduce lumbar lordosis—the inward curve of the lower back, which contributes to a lot of back pain—versus a regular office chair.
back pain chair 1

Back Pain Chair

My wife did a medical mission in Sudan and saw all kinds of people with health issues there, including the women mentioned here that are working under heavy loads all day throughout their lives. I was quoting articles like this one to her in relation to my own back pain and plan to solve it, and she called B.S. on this point, saying that there were loads of people down there with back problems, including the women carrying heavy burdens on their head that had back pain. She said that they definitely had plenty of back pain, but that they weren’t necessarily good at expressing what their problem was. So, statements like “You know those African girls carrying baskets on their heads for miles? No back pain. No neck pain.” I think is probably a gross hyperbole. I’m not saying there’s bad advice in this article, but I wonder if the underlying premise could stand a little scrutiny.
back pain chair 2

Back Pain Chair

An ergonomic office chair can do wonders to alleviate lower back pain that can affect you long after you leave work for the day. If you already suffer from back pain, it’s important to understand that long hours in a chair compress the discs in your lower back, which eventually begin to wear down and cause sharp or chronic pain. This pain can be severe enough to affect your mobility for the rest of your life. The good news? It’s never too late to treat the problem and give your aching back the support it needs.
back pain chair 3

Back Pain Chair

This elaborate test of mice showed that they were less sensitive to certain kinds of pain if they had gotten more exercise. Specifically, regular exercise protected them from pain caused by exercise (no surprise there), but also — a little more interesting — pain caused by injecting carageenan (which causes inflammation). So exercise probably protects mice from the pain of carageenan injections — does that mean it will protect humans from other kinds of pain? We can’t quite go that far based on the this research. Nevertheless, it’s suggestive, and I’m inclined to agree with the authors: “physical inactivity is a risk factor for development of chronic pain and may set the nervous system to respond in an exaggerated way to low-intensity muscle insults.”
back pain chair 4

Back Pain Chair

I found your article my accident but you describe my life!!! I have 2 months with a horrible neck pain which started with a shoulder pain. For the first month I only felt that pain while I was working with my computer and while I was driving my car, for the rest of my activities I felt no pain. Now, I feel that neck pain all day. I went to the Emergency Room after an adjustment with my chiropractor because I felt really bad after that, so they took me X-rays and 2 more tests and everything was ok but I still was with that pain. I went to physical therapy for 3 weeks and nothing!
back pain chair 5

Back Pain Chair

Hello Alex, I found your article my accident but you describe my life!!! I have 2 months with a horrible neck pain which started with a shoulder pain. For the first month I only felt that pain while I was working with my computer and while I was driving my car, for the rest of my activities I felt no pain. Now, I feel that neck pain all day. I went to the Emergency Room after an adjustment with my chiropractor because I felt really bad after that, so they took me X-rays and 2 more tests and everything was ok but I still was with that pain. I went to physical therapy for 3 weeks and nothing! I am going to try what you recommend and I will let you know. Thanks!
back pain chair 6

Back Pain Chair

Part of how kneeling chairs work is by engaging your core as you sit. Kneeling chairs can help strengthen your abdominal muscles by forcing you to sit more upright, making your abs activate more to keep your spine stable. It’s commonly referred to as “active sitting.” “If your core is not activating ,” says Greenstein, “then all that stress and pressure goes on the ligaments instead of the muscles that are designed to support the spine.” Indeed, a 2015 survey of several studies found that strengthening the core muscles is more effective in fighting lower back pain than typical resistance training that’s meant to relieve lower back pain. The core and the back are actually much more intertwined than you may think. “The goal of these chairs is to get the core muscles engaged to stabilize and control the spine in an appropriate posture in order to decrease stress, decrease inflammation, and thus decrease pain,” says Greenstein. “The chairs are designed in order to get that spine into a lumbar lordotic—the inward curving of the lower back—as well as causing the muscles to engage to create stability for the spine so that all the stress is not born by the discs and joints.” Don’t get too excited: You probably won’t end up with a six pack after two weeks with your kneeling chair. But you will end up a stronger core, better posture, and less pain in your lower back.
back pain chair 7

Back Pain Chair

If there is any one factor that you can change to make spending eight hours a day in an office easier, it’s your chair. There is no shortage of evidence proving that being stuck in a chair for too long can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and worsen back pain. In fact, sitting too much is even called worse than smoking. Many people who have office jobs develop problems like numbness, spinal misalignment, joint pain, neck pain, and herniated discs — usually from sitting too long on a poor quality chair without support. While you probably do not want to spend a lot of money on a chair, a high-quality ergonomic chair is an investment in your health, comfort and productivity.
back pain chair 8

I just wanted to add something here. First of all, Thanks to Alex for his awesome free information. One thing that I can add is that if your foot structure is not lined up correctly you will have pain in feet, which also goes up the line to knee and hip and lower back. My Chiropractor adjusted my feet (had a couple bones overlapping and grinding on eachother causing horrible pain) that helped so much, but still had some pain. After his suggestion of getting good arch supports (I have high arches) my feet, knees and hip pain as well as lower back is so much better! Then adding Alex’s posture suggestions, trigger point massage and exercises I can see myself pain free! Starting those today.
back pain chair 9

Hi, I’m 27 and have been suffering with chronic low back pain since I was 14. Being a taller guy (6’3″) I find that most work stations and car seats are not designed for us. My neck posture is horrible because I am forced to look down at my desk who is designed for somebody average height. My chair pretty much has to be on the floor so I can get my knees under the desk to sit. This completely screws up my posture. Any advice for us tall people that have to fit into this average sized world? Its not just sitting that kills me… standing too – especially over a work bench or cooking in a restaurant… I had to quit my sandblasting job and a job at a book store too all before my 21st birthday. Come to think of it, the best my back has been was when I was making $12/hr installing storm sewer pipes. I pretty much just ran all day up and down out of a ditch and lifted heavy heavy construction equipment. Sometimes I think about quitting my nice gig at an engineering firm to go back to that if it would make me feel better. Exercise seems to give me some relief, but its very temporary and sometimes it just makes it worse. I try to do hot yoga and functional HIIT as much as possible to keep me limber, but if I miss a day, its very difficult to get moving again. For fun, I am an avid skiier and mountain biker. Both of these activities seem to help me some, when I am able to participate. I used to do chiropractic at a few different places, I have an inversion table which helps me a lot too, but all of this is not enough alone. I decided to move to Colorado to seek some MMJ options which help some, but its not a cure-all… it really helps me with the sleeping part and the associated depression that accompanies my pain. Usually I’m in so much pain just walking down the sidewalk… I resort to eating lots of ibuprofen and using breathing exercises to get me through the intense pain waves. (I kicked my nasty addiction created by the traditional opiate drug treatment, so I won’t be doing that anymore.) I was told that I could probably benefit from surgurey about 10 years ago, but I was advised that I should hold out as long as possible. What else can I try? Am I trying too hard?

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