Diy Accent Chair

Diy Accent Chair

Are you sitting down? We love us some DIY decor and a unique seat is just the thing to set your room or event apart. From giving new life to an old chair, to creating a new chair from scratch, to decorating a chair for your wedding, these 30 DIYs will knock you off your feet.
diy accent chair 1

Diy Accent Chair

Stencil The Chair Work out a quick layout for placement. I used the center point of the back of the chair for the first stamp, and then marked out spacing at six inches along the top of the chair and down the front-facing arms. The stamping took all of about 15 minutes and after that, the chair dried overnight before use.
diy accent chair 2

Diy Accent Chair

Work out a quick layout for placement. I used the center point of the back of the chair for the first stamp, and then marked out spacing at six inches along the top of the chair and down the front-facing arms. The stamping took all of about 15 minutes and after that, the chair dried overnight before use.
diy accent chair 3

Diy Accent Chair

Who doesn’t love a big, comfy chair? Over at The Design Confidential you can find the plans to build your own suite chair inspired by Pottery Barn Teen. Cher-Ann from Design Studio C built and upholstered this chair for her daughter as a part of her new teen room. It’s the perfect spot for reading, studying, and late night chats on the phone while also adding a decorative touch to the space.
diy accent chair 4

Diy Accent Chair

Slipper chairs have been eluding us DIYers for some time, but I sat down and analyzed a set of chairs I bought from Target, and I think I’ve figured it out! This plan is for BUILDING the slipper chair. I will share how *I* upholstered mine on my blog (will link here when tutorial is complete), but I’m sure you amazing people will know better ways of doing it. I’m having issues listing one of my plans as “intermediate” – because I don’t think that I’m an intermediate builder yet – but the front legs on this gave me some issues. You absolutely have the option of screwing the legs in either to the frame using pocket hole joinery, or attaching without the support I’ll show in steps 6 & 7, but I NEED all the support I can get with climbing kids (and, I hate to mention this, but very overweight family). *I altered the dimensions of the plan to make cushion-buying easier. There are CHEAP 22″ foam cushions at Hobby Lobby (especially if you use the 40% off coupon). So I am giving you a 22″ chair instead of a 24″ chair (I cannot remove the photo in the
diy accent chair 5

Diy Accent Chair

Disassemble your chair, and cut your foam to fit. You will be upholstering the pieces separately. I was able to upholster the entire chair using a single 84″ long curtain panel. Some things to note: – Upholster the seat first, use that as a reference for where to cut the foam on the back (since the seat will take up a couple more inches, you can’t use foam down the entire back) – bring the fabric on the back all the way down to 11″ from the bottom of the leg. That’s where the seat is going to start, and you want it to start uniformly. – there should be no fabric where the seat will be screwed together. Upholster the seat and back completely, then cut the fabric from the area you will be screwing through.
diy accent chair 6

Diy Accent Chair

I am in the process of building my 18 month old a slipper chair (meaning that I’m gathering scraps, but haven’t done anything else :-p), and will document how I upholster it as I do so. I REALLY winged it with the full-sized chair, and didn’t stop to take photos of the process. If any of you amazing builders think you’ve “got this,” please document it for us, in the meantime!
diy accent chair 7

Diy Accent Chair

Hi, my name is Christy and welcome to my blog. This is the place where you can see a little bit of everything. From sewing to painting, reinventing to ripping down and rebuilding, with a little bit of craftiness sprinkled in between, I love a project! If you’re visiting me for the first time, start with my DIY Project Gallery, found by clicking the tab next to ‘Home’. Then stick around and let’s see what else we can get ourselves into!
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Mark your front legs 1 1/2″ down from the top. Now place in the corner of the chair and trace the opening created by the seat supports. You’ll cut out the area that is NOT in the opening. What you’re doing is creating a notch in the front leg that will fit in the triangle opening between the seat supports and the seat. (This part gave me some grief. Let me tell you, if you have a circular saw or a table saw, USE IT! I was able to do this part with a jig saw, but I would not recommend it!)
diy accent chair 9

Shaping the back with a jig saw or other turning saw is quite traditional, and makes for the strongest back. If you have access, a band saw would be even better, and the ideal would be to make one leg, make it perfect, and then duplicate it with a router and pattern bit. Lady Goats’ method is perfect though for a small shop that doesn’t have a fortune to invest in tools. I hadn’t paid much attention to this post before, but I’m really impressed with the construction. I haven’t done a full chair yet, just a couple of stools. Some day, I’ll build cool chairs.
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Breathing a new life into beat up and stained fabric chairs doesn’t always require a trip to an upholsterer. A little paint, some fabric medium, and a graphic stencil can transform a dull and dated chair into something sleek and modern in an afternoon.
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24. Simple Mr. and Mrs. Chair Signs: Ribbon and paper make simple, understated signs for your chairs… and add a little “something blue” to your reception, for extra luck! (via Something Turquoise)
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The chair is constructed using countersunk screws though there are a few pocket holes in areas where the countersunk screws would not be practical. The holes from the countersunk screws will then be filled using the method of your choice – filler, plugs, Dry Dex, etc.
diy accent chair 13

Slipper chairs have been eluding us DIYers for some time, but I sat down and analyzed a set of chairs I bought from Target, and I think I’ve figured it out! This plan is for BUILDING the slipper chair. I will share how *I* upholstered mine on my blog (will link here when tutorial is complete), but I’m sure you amazing people will know better ways of doing it.
diy accent chair 14

I hadn’t paid much attention to this post before, but I’m really impressed with the construction. I haven’t done a full chair yet, just a couple of stools. Some day, I’ll build cool chairs.
diy accent chair 15

Step 6 Instructions: Mark your front legs 1 1/2″ down from the top. Now place in the corner of the chair and trace the opening created by the seat supports. You’ll cut out the area that is NOT in the opening. What you’re doing is creating a notch in the front leg that will fit in the triangle opening between the seat supports and the seat. (This part gave me some grief. Let me tell you, if you have a circular saw or a table saw, USE IT! I was able to do this part with a jig saw, but I would not recommend it!)

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