Diy Chair Upholstery

Diy Chair Upholstery

Sew as required. This section is deliberately scant due to the fact that you need individual instructions depending on the chair type and the amount and type of panels being sewn. In general, you’ll need to sew seams in place, join front and back panels, arm panels, cushion panels, etc. You’ll also need to stitch a skirt if the chair has one. You’ll also need to add zippers and make any cuts needed to fit around parts of the chair. Some more precise examples are provided in the chair type sections noted below. Use straight seams for sewing upholstery fabric. For pleats, etc., you’ll need advanced sewing skills. If not, ask for help from a more experienced sewer. Strong fabric can easily break a domestic sewing machine; you may need access to an industrial one, or send the pieces along for someone else to stitch together for you.
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Diy Chair Upholstery

Cut off excess fabric with a sharp pair of scissors. The fabric should be cut as close to the staple line as possible (Image 1). Apply a line of hot glue along staples and press gimp trim into it (Images 2 and 3). Hold in place until glue is cool. Work in small 6″-8″ sections to prevent glue from cooling too quickly. Where trim ends meet, cut trim to size and secure ends together with hot glue (Image 4). Apply trim where needed to cover staples. Trim threads and remove glue gun strings before enjoying your “new” old chair (Image 5). Tip: Don’t wash fabric before use. Most decorative upholstery weight fabric is treated to resist staining. If fabric is washed prior to using it for upholstery, that protective treatment will be washed away.
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Diy Chair Upholstery

Remove pins and old upholstery from each new fabric panel right before using it, so there is no confusion about what piece goes where. Most chairs should be assembled starting with the inside back, arms and seat. This chair required the back side of chair to be assembled first, followed by the inside back, seat and arms and then outside arms. Secure each panel with one staple to secure it in place and then a staple on each side to make sure panel fits properly and isn’t pulled in one direction or another. Make sure staples are in a straight line that can be covered by a piece of gimp trim (Image 1). Staples should be approximated 1/2″ apart. Seat backs should always be supported with burlap, cardboard or webbing and padding (Image 2). Tip: Don’t try to upholster a chair with an electric or manual staple gun. They are too bulky and not powerful enough for a project like this.
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Diy Chair Upholstery

Pin removed panels of fabric to new upholstery fabric (Image 1). Make sure both pieces of fabric are facing the same direction, so they are an exact copy, not a mirror image (Image 2). Cut new upholstery fabric to size using the old fabric as a pattern (Image 3). Repeat this process with all panels. If a panel needs to be pieced together on a sewing machine, sew those pieces at this step.
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Diy Chair Upholstery

Search Add New Question How do I make the roll of matching material that lines the edges? Donagan You use cording, which you wrap in fabric. Use the old cording, if you have it, or buy some new cording from an upholstery-supply store. The seam of the cording is sewed into the main seam of the piece. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 0 Helpful 4 How do I replace a broken spring? Donagan You may be able to turn the piece upside-down and access the spring that way. Otherwise, you’ll have to remove some fabric to get at it. You may have to replace the spring (an upholstery store or repair shop is a good place to start), or you might be able to repair it with heavy wire. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 1 Helpful 1
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Diy Chair Upholstery

If you’re re-covering more than one chair, number each chair and seat; that way, the screw holes will line up properly when you reinstall the seats. There are special tools just for yanking upholstery staples or tacks, but you can get by with basic hand tools (Photo 1). Tip: Old, dull side cutters are perfect. They grip staples well but don’t cut them off.
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Diy Chair Upholstery

Tips If fabric has a motif or pattern, this should be centered and its top should always face upward, toward the chair’s top. Bear this in mind when preparing the central panel of the chair. It’s best to use plain fabrics at first than to add this additional hurdle while you’re learning. Keep all removed pieces together in a plastic bag. That way, you can reuse items if wished and they’ll all be easily retrievable. Take care when removing covers. If you want to reuse the cover, extra care needs to be taken to avoid rips or tears. Moreover, the surrounding wood can be fragile and needs to be taken into account when removing the upholstery. If you want to reuse stuffing, you’ll also need to be careful to capture it and not disturb it too much.
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Diy Chair Upholstery

If fabric has a motif or pattern, this should be centered and its top should always face upward, toward the chair’s top. Bear this in mind when preparing the central panel of the chair. It’s best to use plain fabrics at first than to add this additional hurdle while you’re learning. Keep all removed pieces together in a plastic bag. That way, you can reuse items if wished and they’ll all be easily retrievable. Take care when removing covers. If you want to reuse the cover, extra care needs to be taken to avoid rips or tears. Moreover, the surrounding wood can be fragile and needs to be taken into account when removing the upholstery. If you want to reuse stuffing, you’ll also need to be careful to capture it and not disturb it too much.
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The other pieces of fabric you can see on the edges of the picture are basically extensions of the fabric to help it to reach the part of the chair to staple into. Here is a piece of cardboard that finished the bottom. I am still in awe that furniture has cardboard in it. We saved the piece, and used fabric glue to adhere the fabric back to it. We then stapled it back on to the chair carefully. It’s hard to explain every single step, so just make sure that you pay attention to how the chair was originally put together. You will be reconstructing the chair to how it was done originally. We ran into a few bumps in the road along the way. For example, in places that we reupholstered right over the original fabric, there was several layers of fabric to staple through. My staple gun would not go far enough into the wood to make it secure, so we had Jen’s husband screw it into place to secure the fabric where it needed to be. I would also suggest to get a fabric that the pattern doesn’t matter which way it goes. Jen’s fabric had to be perfectly lined up, which I think she did a FABULOUS job, but it would be easier to learn and practice with a fabric that doesn’t matter which way it goes. Here is the end result. Great job Jen! She also reupholstered the giraffe one.
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Dearest Brooke – Being “ALL” about Thrifty, I was ecstatic to find your website on reupholstering chairs. You saved me from going nuts!! Thank you. I recovered a chair and a half and it looks fantastic!! It took awhile and I thought my husband might move out, for all the mess. But he loves “my chair”………….. I have to keep reminding him of that. “Sit in your own chair, honey, this one’s MINE”. May I make a suggestion about your site? I noticed there are some typos, so you may want to have someone proof read things for you whenever you update your information. Thanks for helping to turn a drab old chair into real jewel.
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Upholstery can be an intimidating project, but it seems more complicated than it actually is. A thrift store arm chair with simple lines, a sturdy frame and good padding makes a perfect subject for a novice upholsterer.
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Mark the removed fabric panels with arrows, letters and any other indicators that will help you draw the same pattern for the new fabric. Don’t be lazy here––the effort put in now will pay big dividends in accuracy later. It helps to draw a basic sketch of the chair in relation to each fabric panel removed and to note a corresponding letter or number to each fabric piece, written on both the sketch and the fabric piece’s backing. Note special tucks, pleats, folds, etc. so that you can repeat these when making up the new upholstery fabric.
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Lift the stuffing out gently. As much as possible, try to keep the stuffing intact and not torn apart. It’s original positioning has been settled by years of sitting, so it’s already perfect for fitting the chair. Lift off using both hands right up to your folded elbow pits. Have a clean, flat place to put the stuffing onto while you continue working with the upholstery.

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