Hans Wegner Lounge Chair

Hans Wegner Lounge Chair

Hans Wegner (Denmark, 1914-2007) Learn More About Hans Wegner Hans Wegner (Denmark, 1914-2007) Best known for his chairs and seating pieces — though a master of many furniture types like sofas and tables — Hans Wegner was a prolific designer whose elegant, often ebullient, forms and devotion to the finest methods in joinery made “Danish Modern” a popular byword for stylish, well-made furniture in the mid-20th century.      Wegner considered himself a carpenter first and a furniture designer second. Like his peers Arne Jacobsen and Finn Juhl, Wegner believed that striking aesthetics in furniture were based on a foundation of practicality: a chair must be comfortable and sturdy before it is chic.      In keeping with that tenet, several of Wegner’s best chair designs, seen in dealer listings below, have their roots in traditional seating forms. The “Peacock chair” (designed 1947) is a throne-like adaptation of the Windsor chair; pieces from the “China chair” series (begun in 1944) as well as the 1949 “Wishbone chair,” with its distinctive Y-shaped back splat, are derived from 17th-century Ming seating pieces, as is the upholstered “Ox chair” . Wegner’s comfy “Papa Bear chair” is an almost surreally re-scaled English wingback chair.      Wegner’s most representative piece, the “Round chair” , gained a footnote in political history when it was used on the TV stage of the first Kennedy-Nixon debate of 1960. That chair, along with Wegner’s more bravura designs, for example the 1963 “Shell chair,” with its curved surfboard-shaped seat, bring a quietly sculptural presence to a room. Wegner was a designer who revered his primary material — wood — and it shows. His wood gathers patina and character with age; every Hans Wegner piece testifies to the life it has led.
hans wegner lounge chair 1

Hans Wegner Lounge Chair

Hans Wegner (Denmark, 1914-2007) Best known for his chairs and seating pieces — though a master of many furniture types like sofas and tables — Hans Wegner was a prolific designer whose elegant, often ebullient, forms and devotion to the finest methods in joinery made “Danish Modern” a popular byword for stylish, well-made furniture in the mid-20th century.      Wegner considered himself a carpenter first and a furniture designer second. Like his peers Arne Jacobsen and Finn Juhl, Wegner believed that striking aesthetics in furniture were based on a foundation of practicality: a chair must be comfortable and sturdy before it is chic.      In keeping with that tenet, several of Wegner’s best chair designs, seen in dealer listings below, have their roots in traditional seating forms. The “Peacock chair” (designed 1947) is a throne-like adaptation of the Windsor chair; pieces from the “China chair” series (begun in 1944) as well as the 1949 “Wishbone chair,” with its distinctive Y-shaped back splat, are derived from 17th-century Ming seating pieces, as is the upholstered “Ox chair” . Wegner’s comfy “Papa Bear chair” is an almost surreally re-scaled English wingback chair.      Wegner’s most representative piece, the “Round chair” , gained a footnote in political history when it was used on the TV stage of the first Kennedy-Nixon debate of 1960. That chair, along with Wegner’s more bravura designs, for example the 1963 “Shell chair,” with its curved surfboard-shaped seat, bring a quietly sculptural presence to a room. Wegner was a designer who revered his primary material — wood — and it shows. His wood gathers patina and character with age; every Hans Wegner piece testifies to the life it has led.
hans wegner lounge chair 2

Hans Wegner Lounge Chair

Hans J. Wegner is the undisputed master of Danish chair design. Wegner has designed countless chairs, many of which—such as the Hans Wegner Wishbone Chair, Wegner Wing Chair, and Wegner CH07 Shell Chair—are internationally recognized classics. Hans Wegner’s furniture unites form and function; in every design, he places the highest demands on comfort and ergonomics. To Wegner, a chair isn’t just a piece of furniture, but a work of art made to support the human form.  With a background as a skilled cabinet maker, Hans Wegner has a fondness for integrating wood into his chairs, and he has a special talent for using the characteristics of the material to create surprising, sculptural lines. The Danish word for design is “formgivning”, which translated literally means “giving shape”. When you see Hans J. Wegner’s furniture, you begin to understand the true meaning of the word.
hans wegner lounge chair 3

Hans Wegner Lounge Chair

Best known for his chairs and seating pieces — though a master of many furniture types like sofas and tables — Hans Wegner was a prolific designer whose elegant, often ebullient, forms and devotion to the finest methods in joinery made “Danish Modern” a popular byword for stylish, well-made furniture in the mid-20th century.      Wegner considered himself a carpenter first and a furniture designer second. Like his peers Arne Jacobsen and Finn Juhl, Wegner believed that striking aesthetics in furniture were based on a foundation of practicality: a chair must be comfortable and sturdy before it is chic.      In keeping with that tenet, several of Wegner’s best chair designs, seen in dealer listings below, have their roots in traditional seating forms. The “Peacock chair” (designed 1947) is a throne-like adaptation of the Windsor chair; pieces from the “China chair” series (begun in 1944) as well as the 1949 “Wishbone chair,” with its distinctive Y-shaped back splat, are derived from 17th-century Ming seating pieces, as is the upholstered “Ox chair” . Wegner’s comfy “Papa Bear chair” is an almost surreally re-scaled English wingback chair.      Wegner’s most representative piece, the “Round chair” , gained a footnote in political history when it was used on the TV stage of the first Kennedy-Nixon debate of 1960. That chair, along with Wegner’s more bravura designs, for example the 1963 “Shell chair,” with its curved surfboard-shaped seat, bring a quietly sculptural presence to a room. Wegner was a designer who revered his primary material — wood — and it shows. His wood gathers patina and character with age; every Hans Wegner piece testifies to the life it has led.
hans wegner lounge chair 4

Hans Wegner Lounge Chair

Hans J. Wegner is the undisputed master of Danish chair design. Wegner has designed countless chairs, many of which—such as the Hans Wegner Wishbone Chair, Wegner Wing Chair, and Wegner CH07 Shell Chair—are internationally recognized classics. Hans Wegner’s furniture unites form and function; in every design, he places the highest demands on comfort and ergonomics. To Wegner, a chair isn’t just a piece of furniture, but a work of art made to support the human form. 
hans wegner lounge chair 5

Hans Wegner Lounge Chair

     Wegner’s most representative piece, the “Round chair” , gained a footnote in political history when it was used on the TV stage of the first Kennedy-Nixon debate of 1960. That chair, along with Wegner’s more bravura designs, for example the 1963 “Shell chair,” with its curved surfboard-shaped seat, bring a quietly sculptural presence to a room. Wegner was a designer who revered his primary material — wood — and it shows. His wood gathers patina and character with age; every Hans Wegner piece testifies to the life it has led.
hans wegner lounge chair 6

Hans Wegner Lounge Chair

Danish designer Hans J. Wegner preferred to work in solid wood, but occasionally he explored the use of bent plywood, and for that we are very thankful. Sometimes called the “smiling chair,” his Shell Chair achieves a floating lightness due to its wing-like seat and the arching curves of its tapered legs. And while it stands on only three legs, this chair has an absolute stability that could only be achieved by someone with Wegner’s expertise in cabinetmaking and architecture. Wegner’s belief that a chair “should be beautiful from all sides and angles” is especially evident with his Shell Chair. This comfortable masterpiece is a marvel of grace and beauty. This is the authentic Shell Chair produced by Carl Hansen & Søn. Made in Denmark.
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Hans Wegner Lounge Chair

Description Danish designer Hans J. Wegner preferred to work in solid wood, but occasionally he explored the use of bent plywood, and for that we are very thankful. Sometimes called the “smiling chair,” his Shell Chair achieves a floating lightness due to its wing-like seat and the arching curves of its tapered legs. And while it stands on only three legs, this chair has an absolute stability that could only be achieved by someone with Wegner’s expertise in cabinetmaking and architecture. Wegner’s belief that a chair “should be beautiful from all sides and angles” is especially evident with his Shell Chair. This comfortable masterpiece is a marvel of grace and beauty. This is the authentic Shell Chair produced by Carl Hansen & Søn. Made in Denmark. View All Images
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Hans J. Wegner's CH25 Easy Chair is the only Wegner chair available with a papercord seat and back. The CH25 chair's special leg profile is its most distinctive feature. Their unusual shape make them carry most of the user's weight and serve as a stable support for the armrests at the same time. Another interesting detail is the hind legs, which are flush with the back. The broad armrests add to the comfort of the CH25 chair and make this Wegner chair easy to get up from, even with it has a low seat and reclining back.
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Hans Wegner Hans Jørgensen Wegner’s (1914 – 2007) high-quality and thoughtful work contributed to the international popularity of mid-century Danish design. His style is often described as Organic Functionality, a modernist school with emphasis on functionality, arising primarily in Scandinavian countries. In his lifetime, he designed over 500 different chairs, over 100 of which were put into mass production, with many recognizable icons among them. Born to cobbler Peter M. Wegner, he worked as a child apprentice to Master cabinetmaker H. F. Stahlberg. With an affinity for wood, he attended the Danish School of Arts and Crafts and the Architectural Academy in Copenhagen. In 1936, he began studies at what is now The Danish Design School, with O. Mølgaard Nielsen as teacher.

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