Knoll Tulip Chair

Knoll Tulip Chair

Knoll With a furniture catalog that consists almost exclusively of headliners—including Harry Bertoia, George Nakashima, and Eero Saarinen among others—Knoll Furniture made a name for itself as the place for Mid-Century designers to cut their teeth. Knoll continues to produce many of their original designs today, but vintage Knoll furniture remains just as covetable. And it’s easy to see why—equal parts retro and futuristic, used Knoll furniture beckons to the past while working a thoroughly modern angle. Following Follow This Search
knoll tulip chair 1

Knoll Tulip Chair

Description Eero Saarinen called himself a “form giver,” and everything he designed – from the Gateway Arch in St. Louis to his Womb™ Chair to his Pedestal Table – had a strong sculptural quality. “The underside of typical tables and chairs makes a confusing, unrestful world,” said Saarinen. In a 1956 cover story in Time magazine, he announced that he was designing a collection to “clear up the slum of legs in the U.S. home.” Later that year, he completed his Pedestal Table and Tulip Chair Collection with its cast aluminum base inspired by a drop of high-viscosity liquid. The seat swivels for easy entrance to or exit from a table. Each chair is stamped with the KnollStudio logo and Eero Saarinen’s signature. This is the authentic Tulip Collection produced by Knoll. Made in Italy. The Tulip Collection is Greenguard Indoor Air Quality Certified®. View All Images
knoll tulip chair 2

Knoll Tulip Chair

Eero Saarinen called himself a “form giver,” and everything he designed – from the Gateway Arch in St. Louis to his Womb™ Chair to his Pedestal Table – had a strong sculptural quality. “The underside of typical tables and chairs makes a confusing, unrestful world,” said Saarinen. In a 1956 cover story in Time magazine, he announced that he was designing a collection to “clear up the slum of legs in the U.S. home.” Later that year, he completed his Pedestal Table and Tulip Chair Collection with its cast aluminum base inspired by a drop of high-viscosity liquid. The seat swivels for easy entrance to or exit from a table. Each chair is stamped with the KnollStudio logo and Eero Saarinen’s signature. This is the authentic Tulip Collection produced by Knoll. Made in Italy. The Tulip Collection is Greenguard Indoor Air Quality Certified®.
knoll tulip chair 3

Knoll Tulip Chair

With a furniture catalog that consists almost exclusively of headliners—including Harry Bertoia, George Nakashima, and Eero Saarinen among others—Knoll Furniture made a name for itself as the place for Mid-Century designers to cut their teeth. Knoll continues to produce many of their original designs today, but vintage Knoll furniture remains just as covetable. And it’s easy to see why—equal parts retro and futuristic, used Knoll furniture beckons to the past while working a thoroughly modern angle.
knoll tulip chair 4

Knoll Tulip Chair

Eero Saarinen called himself a “form giver,” and everything he designed – from the Gateway Arch in St. Louis to his Womb™ Chair to his Pedestal Table – had a strong sculptural quality. “The underside of typical tables and chairs makes a confusing, unrestful world,” said Saarinen. In a 1956 cover story in Time magazine, he announced that he was designing a collection to “clear up the slum of legs in the U.S. home.” Later that year, he completed his Pedestal Table and Tulip Chair Collection with its cast aluminum base inspired by a drop of high-viscosity liquid. The seat swivels for easy entrance to or exit from a table. Each chair is stamped with the KnollStudio logo and Eero Saarinen’s signature. This is the authentic Tulip Collection produced by Knoll. Made in Italy.
knoll tulip chair 5

Knoll Tulip Chair

     At Cranbrook, Saarinen also met Florence Schust Knoll, who, as director of her husband Hans Knoll’s eponymous furniture company, would put Saarinen’s best designs into production. These include the “Grasshopper” chair, designed in 1946 and so named because its angled bentwood frame resembles the insect; the “Tulip” chair , a flower-shaped fiberglass shell mounted on a cast-aluminum pedestal; and the lushly contoured “Womb” lounge chair and ottoman . In his furniture as in his architecture, the keynotes of Eero Saarinen’s designs are simplicity, strength and grace.
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Knoll Tulip Chair

Eero Saarinen (USA, 1910-1961) Learn More About Eero Saarinen Eero Saarinen (USA, 1910-1961) Through his work as an architect and designer, Eero Saarinen was a prime mover in the introduction of modernism into the American mainstream. Particularly affecting were the organic, curvilinear forms seen in Saarinen’s furniture and his best-known structures: the gull-winged TWA Flight Center at John F. Kennedy airport in New York (opened 1962), Dulles International Airport in Virginia and the Gateway Arch in St. Louis, Missouri .      Saarinen had a peerless modernist pedigree. His father, Eliel Saarinen, was an eminent Finnish architect who in 1932 became the first head of the Cranbrook Academy of Art in suburban Detroit. The school became synonymous with progressive design and decorative arts in the United States, and while studying there the younger Saarinen met and befriended several luminaries of mid-century modernism, among them Harry Bertoia, and Charles and Ray Eames.      At Cranbrook, Saarinen also met Florence Schust Knoll, who, as director of her husband Hans Knoll’s eponymous furniture company, would put Saarinen’s best designs into production. These include the “Grasshopper” chair, designed in 1946 and so named because its angled bentwood frame resembles the insect; the “Tulip” chair , a flower-shaped fiberglass shell mounted on a cast-aluminum pedestal; and the lushly contoured “Womb” lounge chair and ottoman . In his furniture as in his architecture, the keynotes of Eero Saarinen’s designs are simplicity, strength and grace.
knoll tulip chair 7

Knoll Tulip Chair

Eero Saarinen (USA, 1910-1961) Through his work as an architect and designer, Eero Saarinen was a prime mover in the introduction of modernism into the American mainstream. Particularly affecting were the organic, curvilinear forms seen in Saarinen’s furniture and his best-known structures: the gull-winged TWA Flight Center at John F. Kennedy airport in New York (opened 1962), Dulles International Airport in Virginia and the Gateway Arch in St. Louis, Missouri .      Saarinen had a peerless modernist pedigree. His father, Eliel Saarinen, was an eminent Finnish architect who in 1932 became the first head of the Cranbrook Academy of Art in suburban Detroit. The school became synonymous with progressive design and decorative arts in the United States, and while studying there the younger Saarinen met and befriended several luminaries of mid-century modernism, among them Harry Bertoia, and Charles and Ray Eames.      At Cranbrook, Saarinen also met Florence Schust Knoll, who, as director of her husband Hans Knoll’s eponymous furniture company, would put Saarinen’s best designs into production. These include the “Grasshopper” chair, designed in 1946 and so named because its angled bentwood frame resembles the insect; the “Tulip” chair , a flower-shaped fiberglass shell mounted on a cast-aluminum pedestal; and the lushly contoured “Womb” lounge chair and ottoman . In his furniture as in his architecture, the keynotes of Eero Saarinen’s designs are simplicity, strength and grace.
knoll tulip chair 8

Through his work as an architect and designer, Eero Saarinen was a prime mover in the introduction of modernism into the American mainstream. Particularly affecting were the organic, curvilinear forms seen in Saarinen’s furniture and his best-known structures: the gull-winged TWA Flight Center at John F. Kennedy airport in New York (opened 1962), Dulles International Airport in Virginia and the Gateway Arch in St. Louis, Missouri .      Saarinen had a peerless modernist pedigree. His father, Eliel Saarinen, was an eminent Finnish architect who in 1932 became the first head of the Cranbrook Academy of Art in suburban Detroit. The school became synonymous with progressive design and decorative arts in the United States, and while studying there the younger Saarinen met and befriended several luminaries of mid-century modernism, among them Harry Bertoia, and Charles and Ray Eames.      At Cranbrook, Saarinen also met Florence Schust Knoll, who, as director of her husband Hans Knoll’s eponymous furniture company, would put Saarinen’s best designs into production. These include the “Grasshopper” chair, designed in 1946 and so named because its angled bentwood frame resembles the insect; the “Tulip” chair , a flower-shaped fiberglass shell mounted on a cast-aluminum pedestal; and the lushly contoured “Womb” lounge chair and ottoman . In his furniture as in his architecture, the keynotes of Eero Saarinen’s designs are simplicity, strength and grace.
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In the late 1960s the Tulip chair was used on the TV show Star Trek where they appeared on the bridge set of the U.S.S. Enterprise and throughout the rest of the ship. The bridge chairs were slightly modified Tulip chairs that featured plastic appliqués attached to their back panels. After the show was canceled most of the set furnishing were discarded into trash dumpsters. An original bridge Tulip chair was offered during the Profiles in History Hollywood Auction #17, selling for $18,000.
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The puristically designed Tulip Chair is reminiscent of the shape of a tulip, as per its name, and combines modernity with classic Scandinavian design. Eero Saarinen describes the background to the design of the Tulip Chair as such: ‘I wanted to clean up the clutter of legs.
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Saarinen was assisted by Don Petitt, of Knoll’s Design Development Group, who introduced several ingenious methods of model making. Together with a Knoll design research team, they worked out the problems arising in production. Full scale models became furniture and, with family and friends acting as “guinea pigs,” the furniture was tested in the dining room and living room of the Saarinen house in Bloomfield Hills.

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