Le Corbusier Chair

Le Corbusier Chair

Le Corbusier SWITZERLAND (1887–1965) Widely considered one of the most influential architects of the 20th century, Le Corbusier (born Charles-Édouard Jeanneret-Gris) is credited with changing the face of urban architecture, bringing it into the technological age. Connecting architecture with revolution, his legacy demonstrates a strong, if utopian, sense of purpose to meet the needs of a democratic society dominated by the machine. “Modern life demands, and is waiting for, a new kind of plan, both for the house and the city,” he said in 1923. Born in Switzerland, Le Corbusier was encouraged by a teacher to take up architecture. He built his first house at the age of 18 for a member of his school’s teaching staff. In 1908, he went to Paris and began to practice with Auguste Perret, an architect known for his pioneering use of concrete and reinforced steel. Moving to Berlin, Le Corbusier worked with Peter Behrens, who taught him about industrial processes and machine design. In 1917, he returned to Paris, where he met post-Cubist Amédée Ozenfant and developed Purism, a new concept of painting. In 1920, still in Paris, he adopted the pseudonym Le Corbusier. Paradoxically, Le Corbusier combined a passion for classical Greek architecture and an attraction to the modern machine. He published his ideas in a book entitled Vers une Architecture, in which he refers to the house as a “machine for living,” an industrial product that should include functional furniture or “equipment de l’habitation.” In this spirit, Le Corbusier co-designed a system of furniture with his cousin Pierre Jeanneret and Charlotte Perriand. The tubular steel furniture – including the famous LC4 Chaise Longue and LC2 and LC3 seating collections – projected a new rationalist aesthetic that came to epitomize the International Style. Corbusier was both credited with and criticized for his reinvention of the modern urban skyline – notably, the buildings he pioneered in Paris’ banlieues, which were considered efficient but austere. Though Le Corbusier’s illustrious career came to an abrupt end in 1965 when he drowned while swimming in the Mediterranean Sea off Roquebrune-Cap-Martin in France, his influence is undisputed. Artist photo from 1000 Chairs courtesy of Taschen. LC2 Petit Modele Armchair A modern response to the traditional club chair, this “cushion basket” is a study in elegant minimalism. LC4 Chaise Lounge Devoid of superfluous ornamentation, the simple shape of the LC4 leaves no doubt as to the function of its form. LC1 Sling Chair This chair pairs the purity of simple tubular steel with the sensual warmth of natural hide. “To be modern is not a fashion; it is a state.” Le Corbusier Explore All Le Corbusier Designs
le corbusier chair 1

Le Corbusier Chair

LC Collection The “Le Corbusier” collection, as it has been called since the nineteen seventies, would never have seen the light of day without the programme created by Le Corbusier in April 1927. He used sketches to establish the positions of the human body that the seating designs had to refl ect. Of course, there would never have been a collection without the collaboration of Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret and Charlotte Perriand either. Charlotte Perriand was a furniture designer, and was the partner of Le Corbusier and Pierre Jeanneret. She took over the project and in 1928, created the Fauteuil grand confort, grand et petit modèle armchair, the Chaise longue basculante and the reclining Fauteuil dossier basculant small armchair, the swivel Fauteuil pivotant small armchair, along with the Tabouret de salle de bains stool which she had previously designed. This range of furniture was produced by Thonet from 1930 under the name “Le Corbusier, P. Jeanneret, Ch. Perriand” and was included in the “Des casiers, des chaises et des tables” (containers, seats and tables) concept conceived by Le Corbusier and Pierre Jeanneret in 1925. Heidi Weber, a gallery-owner in Zurich, launched a collection containing a restyled Chaise longue basculante, Fauteuil à dossier basculant and Fauteuil grand confort, grand et petit modèle in Switzerland in 1959. These pieces were built by local artisans and were baptised “le corbusier sitzmöbel/ sièges/chairs”. Distribution was very limited and each model bore the initials “LC”. Heidi Weber engaged the company Cassina S.p.A. of Meda to manufacture these four models in 1964 when the Maison de l’homme was being built in Zurich. The Italian company Cassina acquired the production and sales rights to these models designed in 1928 by Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret and Charlotte Perriand by contract dated 23 October 1964. The exclusive rights to manufacture and sell these models were extended from Italy to Europe, to the Americas in 1967 and the whole world in 1971. The range was further expanded in the 1970s to include most of the furniture designed by Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret and Charlotte Perriand under the direction of the Fondation Le Corbusier and Charlotte Perriand in collaboration with Filippo Alison and Cassina. The LC collection was also extended to include a furniture series designed by Le Corbusier alone in 2010, with the series marking a return to nature by the great architect as he pared the wooden pieces back down to the essentials. more
le corbusier chair 2

Le Corbusier Chair

The “Le Corbusier” collection, as it has been called since the nineteen seventies, would never have seen the light of day without the programme created by Le Corbusier in April 1927. He used sketches to establish the positions of the human body that the seating designs had to refl ect. Of course, there would never have been a collection without the collaboration of Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret and Charlotte Perriand either. Charlotte Perriand was a furniture designer, and was the partner of Le Corbusier and Pierre Jeanneret. She took over the project and in 1928, created the Fauteuil grand confort, grand et petit modèle armchair, the Chaise longue basculante and the reclining Fauteuil dossier basculant small armchair, the swivel Fauteuil pivotant small armchair, along with the Tabouret de salle de bains stool which she had previously designed. This range of furniture was produced by Thonet from 1930 under the name “Le Corbusier, P. Jeanneret, Ch. Perriand” and was included in the “Des casiers, des chaises et des tables” (containers, seats and tables) concept conceived by Le Corbusier and Pierre Jeanneret in 1925. Heidi Weber, a gallery-owner in Zurich, launched a collection containing a restyled Chaise longue basculante, Fauteuil à dossier basculant and Fauteuil grand confort, grand et petit modèle in Switzerland in 1959. These pieces were built by local artisans and were baptised “le corbusier sitzmöbel/ sièges/chairs”. Distribution was very limited and each model bore the initials “LC”. Heidi Weber engaged the company Cassina S.p.A. of Meda to manufacture these four models in 1964 when the Maison de l’homme was being built in Zurich. The Italian company Cassina acquired the production and sales rights to these models designed in 1928 by Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret and Charlotte Perriand by contract dated 23 October 1964. The exclusive rights to manufacture and sell these models were extended from Italy to Europe, to the Americas in 1967 and the whole world in 1971. The range was further expanded in the 1970s to include most of the furniture designed by Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret and Charlotte Perriand under the direction of the Fondation Le Corbusier and Charlotte Perriand in collaboration with Filippo Alison and Cassina. The LC collection was also extended to include a furniture series designed by Le Corbusier alone in 2010, with the series marking a return to nature by the great architect as he pared the wooden pieces back down to the essentials. more
le corbusier chair 3

Le Corbusier Chair

The “Le Corbusier” collection, as it has been called since the nineteen seventies, would never have seen the light of day without the programme created by Le Corbusier in April 1927. He used sketches to establish the positions of the human body that the seating designs had to refl ect. Of course, there would never have been a collection without the collaboration of Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret and Charlotte Perriand either. Charlotte Perriand was a furniture designer, and was the partner of Le Corbusier and Pierre Jeanneret. She took over the project and in 1928, created the Fauteuil grand confort, grand et petit modèle armchair, the Chaise longue basculante and the reclining Fauteuil dossier basculant small armchair, the swivel Fauteuil pivotant small armchair, along with the Tabouret de salle de bains stool which she had previously designed. This range of furniture was produced by Thonet from 1930 under the name “Le Corbusier, P. Jeanneret, Ch. Perriand” and was included in the “Des casiers, des chaises et des tables” (containers, seats and tables) concept conceived by Le Corbusier and Pierre Jeanneret in 1925. Heidi Weber, a gallery-owner in Zurich, launched a collection containing a restyled Chaise longue basculante, Fauteuil à dossier basculant and Fauteuil grand confort, grand et petit modèle in Switzerland in 1959. These pieces were built by local artisans and were baptised “le corbusier sitzmöbel/ sièges/chairs”. Distribution was very limited and each model bore the initials “LC”. Heidi Weber engaged the company Cassina S.p.A. of Meda to manufacture these four models in 1964 when the Maison de l’homme was being built in Zurich. The Italian company Cassina acquired the production and sales rights to these models designed in 1928 by Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret and Charlotte Perriand by contract dated 23 October 1964. The exclusive rights to manufacture and sell these models were extended from Italy to Europe, to the Americas in 1967 and the whole world in 1971. The range was further expanded in the 1970s to include most of the furniture designed by Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret and Charlotte Perriand under the direction of the Fondation Le Corbusier and Charlotte Perriand in collaboration with Filippo Alison and Cassina. The LC collection was also extended to include a furniture series designed by Le Corbusier alone in 2010, with the series marking a return to nature by the great architect as he pared the wooden pieces back down to the essentials.

Le Corbusier Chair

Le Corbusier Chair
Le Corbusier Chair
Le Corbusier Chair

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